Seven School Social Work Facts (as told by Dance Moms) by Gilda Goldental-Stoecker

  1. 18,000 school social workers are employed today according to the School Social Workers Association. (Lecture notes 4/5/2016)

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  1. States vary in what they require from school social workers. Some states require extra credentials, school based internships, or specific coursework in order to work in schools as social workers. Some states only require a Bachelors of Arts from an accredited university in order to work in schools as social workers. (Lecture notes 4/5/2016)

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  1. In New York State, school social workers need a Masters in Social Work as well as Dignity for All Students Act training and school violence training. (Lecture notes 4/5/2016)

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  1. Response to Intervention (RTI) is a public health model that promotes three tiers at intervention. They include primary (all students/school-wide), secondary (selective interventions, about 20% of students or less), and tertiary (individualized interventions). (Lecture notes 4/5/2016)

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  1. School-wide interventions can include teacher trainings, prevention programs, and working with administration on needs assessments to determine what types of programs are needed. (Lecture notes 4/5/2016)

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  1. With group intervention there are support groups. Some examples of support groups are banana splits (for children of divorced parents), anti-bullying/bullying victims, disability support, boys or girls groups, anger management, and art therapy. (Lecture notes 4/5/2016)

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  1. Individual interventions include a caseload of students that must be seen regularly for counseling by the social worker. They can be part of an Individual Education Plan (IEP), disciplinary action, or at the request of the school or the family. School-based interventions are usually brief and tend to use cognitive behavioral therapy or solution-focused therapy due to school day constraints. (Lecture notes 4/5/2016)200-4
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