4 Reasons Why More Gerontological Social Workers are Needed by Emily Panganiban

  1. There is a growing population of elderly. The demand for the services of gerontological social worker is on the rise with a growing population of elderly. In the United States, the population of the elderly is estimated to be double the population of elderly in 2000 by 2030. The larger population of elderly will need more people to serve them. (In Class Lecture Notes)kvtfiwsgi9k3mvia giphy
  2. Caregivers need help. According to DiNitto and McNeece (2008), caregiving, while being “…a meaningful and rewarding experience,” also “…causes stress; feeling of anger, depression, guilt, anxiety, loneliness, and isolation; and physical health problems.” Social workers can help caregivers by assisting them in getting respite care, housekeeping services, or a personal attendant (p.279).
  3. The elderly may not have support. They may be living alone without a spouse or any family to support them. A social worker can step in and provide them with the support they need and make a difference in their lives. (In Class Lecture Notes)lgipblsvywt8qvia giphy
  4. Care access. Because of racial, income, and ethnic inequalities, the elderly may not be able to receive the healthcare that they need. This is especially a problem for access in terms of mental healthcare since one in five people over the age of 55 have concerns dealing with mental health. A social worker could help them access resources and programs in the community. (In Class Lecture Notes)

References:

DiNitto, D., & McNeece, C. (2008). Social work: Issues and opportunities in a challenging profession (3rd ed.). Chicago, IL: Lyceum Books.

Vassello, J. In Class Lecture. April 26, 2016

6 Factors Social Workers Consider in Treating Mental Illness by Emily Panganiban

  1. Gender. For example, it is known that women seem to have a higher risk for depression. Social workers must make sure not to over diagnose women and not to under diagnose men. (DiNitto & McNeece, 2008)
  2. Ethnicity. There can be differences between ethnicities such as rates of mental health service use and differences in socioeconomic factors. The different cultures of those ethnicities may also have mental illnesses that don’t appear in other cultures such as mal de ojo. (DiNitto & McNeece, 2008)ft55riijdumj2via giphy
  3. Other disorders the client may have. A client could have two mental illnesses or substance abuse disorder in addition to their mental illness. (DiNitto & McNeece, 2008)
  4. The Cause. There is often no clear cause for a mental illness. There could be a number of factors contributing to the cause of the mental illness and these factors could be difficult to identify. (In Class Lecture)
  5. The trajectory of the mental illness. Mental illness takes on a different path for each individual. One person’s depression may not follow the same trajectory as another person’s depression. There are individual differences. (In Class Lecture)vtehwzwndmuwgvia giphy
  6. There is no cure-all for mental illness. There is no specific treatment that works to cure mental illness. One type of treatment that works for one client, may not work for another client with the same mental illness. It may even take a combination of treatments in order to make progress with the client. (In Class Lecture)

References:

DiNitto, D. M., & McNeece, C. A. (2008). Social Work: Issues and Opportunities in a Challenging Profession, Third Edition. Chicago, IL: Lyceum Books, INC.

In Class Lecture, April 19, 2016

6 Ways Social Workers Serve Those with Disabilities by Emily Panganiban

  1. Social workers can create better conditions for those with developmental disabilities by working on policy making and lobbying.(DiNitto & McNeece, 2008)
  2. They an provide counseling to the family members of people with a developmental disability. It can be tough for a parent to see their child not reaching developmental milestones—social workers can help them and other family members cope with their feelings as they go through hardships.(DiNitto & McNeece, 2008)r2pozyrxb9umi via giphy
  3. Assist elderly people who are still caring for their adult children. As people with developmental disabilities grow older, so do their caretakers. Eventually caretakers may also need assistance in their daily lives and this makes it difficult for them to take care of their adult children.(DiNitto & McNeece, 2008)
  4. Social workers working on a mezzo level can give consultation on how to accommodate programs for people with a developmental disability. Accommodations made to programs and services usually easily accessible to those without a developmental disability can greatly improve the quality of life for those with a disability. (DiNitto & McNeece, 2008)                   rxv5270gniqrevia giphy1nudusylnwm8ovia giphy
  5. Social workers can also be consulted on how a community residence for people with intellectual disabilities can be opened.(DiNitto & McNeece, 2008)
  6. Social workers can research disabilities. Especially as people with disabilities are living longer, it’s important for research to be done to learn more in order to improve their quality of life.(DiNitto & McNeece, 2008)   xjygxkxa9gfay via giphy

 

References:

DiNitto, D., & McNeece, C. (2008). Social work: Issues and opportunities in a challenging profession (3rd ed.). Chicago, IL: Lyceum Books.

4 Ways School Social Workers Benefit Students by Emily Panganiban

  1. Social workers that work in a school setting are mandated reporters. If a social worker is suspicious that a student is being neglected or abused, they must report it. Because of this, students can be taken away from dangerous situations. (In class lecture, 4/5/2016)
  2. A student can confide in a social worker. Social workers are bound to confidentiality, so a student can confide in a social worker without fear of their words spreading outside of their conversation. The only situations in which a client’s information would be discussed with someone that is not the client or the client’s legal guardian is if there is a specific professional reason why the information should be disclosed. Even if there is a situation, social workers don’t need to tell every single detail. (Bligen, 4/7/2016)        3ofycynrra8qo1cv8q
  3. Students that see school social workers may reduce their behavioral problems. In a study by Diehl and Frey, it was found that students that saw them during a 6-month period had reduced behavioral problems seen by their parents and teachers. (Diehl & Frey, 2008)
  4. School social workers work with the family as well as the student. The person that goes to school every day is the student not the family members, so the family could be almost completely disconnected from the student’s life at school. A school social worker can encourage parents to get more involved. (In class lecture, 4/5/2016)zpxb41fw27zvm

References:

Bligen, S. In class lecture, 4/7/2016

Diehl, D., & Frey, A. (2008). Evaluating a Community-School Model of Social Work Practice. School Social Work Journal, 32(2), 2-17.

In class lecture, 4/5/2016

4 Difficulties in Child Welfare by Emily Panganiban

  1.  Many people that outgrow the foster care system don’t have ongoing familial support. Often, homelessness is the consequence for lack of support. This is why it is so important that transitional services and programs exist for children that age out of the system. (DiNitto & McNeece, 2008)
  2. There are so many cases of child abuse and not enough judges. According to DiNitto and McNeece (2008, p. 247), judges “often have as little as four minutes to devote to a particular child’s hearing”. Four minutes is such a short amount of time to hear a child’s case then decide on their placement—a social worker’s assessment of the child’s situation is pertinent to making this decision.3o7abkjnla3n2yqhe0 via giphy
  3. A foster home is not always the best place to be for the child. Without proper training or being an adequate fit for foster parenting, a foster parent’s home can be an unsafe place for a child. It’s up to a social worker to train and make sure foster parents are suited for the task of taking in a child. (DiNitto & McNeece, 2008)
  4. Working in child welfare is stressful. For the large amount of work that is placed upon them, social workers do not get paid enough and, as a result, “…child welfare staff turnover commonly exeeds 30 percent a year” (DiNitto & McNeece, 2008, p. 257).                                              krin0djscxhya via giphy

 

References:

DiNitto, D., & McNeece, C. (2008). Social work: Issues and opportunities in a challenging profession (3rd ed.). Chicago, IL: Lyceum Books.

4 Reasons Why More Education on Addiction and Substance Abuse in Social Work Courses is Needed by Emily Panganiban

  1. Many social workers, regardless of their area of social work, will interact with clients with an addiction. Three-fourths of the NASW’s social workers have worked with a client with an addiction or substance abuse (DiNitto & McNeece, 2008). Of all social workers, almost half will have clients with an addiction in their career (In class lecture).                     li9bwmgjftvik
  2. People with addictions have a bad reputation. Many people think the cause of having an addiction is due to not having enough will power or that it’s a conscious choice and that they can control when and if they stop. Social workers can also have this bias and this can affect their work. It’s important for social workers to know that there are other factors that lead to addictions so that they can give the best care possible to those with an addiction. (DiNitto & McNeece, 2008)bh3waqynznkog
  3. Addiction does not apply exclusively to drugs. When you think of an addiction, the first thought that comes to mind may be someone addicted to alcohol or drugs such as marijuana or heroine. People can have an addiction to gambling, eating, or shopping and addictions such as these can be just as damaging to their lives. Social workers need to be prepared to treat these other addictions as seriously as they treat addiction to drugs. (DiNitto & McNeece, 2008)3o6gbenqcujegtanfw
  4. Relapse. People with addictions often need to try more than once to get rid of their addiction. A social worker needs to be equipped with the skills and knowledge to help their clients with relapse prevention and to understand that relapse is part of the process. (DiNitto & McNeece, 2008)12dvtbaawimguo

 

References:

In Class Lecture (3/15/2016)

DiNitto, D., & McNeece, C. (2008). Social work: Issues and opportunities in a challenging profession (3rd ed.). Chicago, IL: Lyceum Books.

4 Reasons Why Social Workers are Beneficial to People in the Military by Emily Panganiban

  1. Those in the military can bring their families on to military bases. Being in the military can complicate family life. Often times, people in the military must spend time apart from their families and this can put a strain on the family and especially married life. A social worker can offer their services to a married couple and offer counseling. (in class lecture, 3/8/16)                                                                                                  yeig5wmfvmnnwvia giphy
  2. Coming back can be tough. Many veterans come back from service with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Their experiences from the warzone followed these soldiers back home. These are the people that need support and social workers can offer that support through services such as counseling and group therapy. (Studgeon, in class lecture)          l41m6xqyspxis3oeqvia giphy
  3. During service, those in the military may need services and programs that social workers can offer. These services and programs may include mental health services, combat stress response teams, and substance abuse treatment. (Daley, 2015)zh5d05dyxnixmvia giphy
  4. It’s not just veterans that are affected by PTSD. Spouses of those in the military can be affected by their partner’s PTSD. Many marriages end because the veteran’s spouse is unable to cope with a veteran’s nightmares or anger management issues. In addition to this, veterans that have come back from war may feel overly protective of their family and, therefore, may not allow their spouse or children to go out. This may result in secondary PTSD. (Studgeon, in class lecture)lu30ilszcce3evia giphy

 

References:

Daley, J. (2003). Military Social Work: A Multi-Country Comparison. International Social Work Int Soc Work, 46(4), 437-448.

In class lecture, March 8, 2016

Studgeon, C. In class lecture. March 10, 2016