5 Unique Facts About Rural Social Work!

(1) President Theodore Roosevelt was the founder of much early social work and in particular, focused on national concern about life in rural areas. He began touching on these issues with conferences that took place in the white house. These conferences led to the creation of child protective services and eventually social security. His efforts have led to the creation and expansion of rural social work (Ginsberg, 2011).

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(2) The concept of bartering is something unique to social workers working in rural areas. Bartering is simply the exchange of goods or services as payment for treatment. It should be noted that goods are preferred over services. It should also be noted that the NASW suggests using this form of payment as a last resort. The social worker will carry the full burden if this exchange ends up being detrimental to the client – social worker relationship (Croxton, Jayaratne, & Mattison, 2002).

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(3) Rural social work encompasses many fields of practice. Therefore, it has been predicted that it will continue to grow in the areas that social work is expected to grow in. In order to promote positive growth for rural social work, social workers should work to emphasize community based approaches and incorporate newer technology to enhance the services they can provide to individuals in rural settings (Murty, 2005).

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(4) Within rural communities, it is likely that everyone knows each other, due to the strong sense of community engagement and concern for communal well-being. As a result, social workers are likely to face the challenge of dual relationships, in which they must learn to set clear boundaries with clients they may see in public places or receive additional services from (DiNitto & McNeece, 2008,  p. 350).

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(5) Rural communities often have much less movement of individuals into and out of the community in comparison to more urban areas. Because of this, problems within rural communities frequently become generational. This may seem like a daunting trend for social workers to overcome, but it also creates a unique opportunity for rural social workers to make very lasting change within a family or throughout the community (Colleen Cunningham Rozelle).

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Works Cited

Colleen Cunningham Rozelle

Croxton, T. A., Jayaratne, S., & Mattison, D. (2007). Social Work Practice Behaviors and Beliefs: Rural-Urban Differences? In Advances in Social Work (2nd ed., Vol. 3, pp. 117-132). Indianapolis, IA: Indiana University.

DiNitto, D., & McNeece, C. (2008). Social work: Issues and opportunities in a challenging profession (3rd ed.). Chicago, IL: Lyceum Books.

Ginsberg, L. H. (2011). Social Work in Rural Communities (5th ed.). Alexandria, VA: Council on Social Work Education.

Murty, S. A. (2005). The Future of Rural Social Work. Advances in Social Work, 6(1), 132-144. Retrieved April 27, 2016.

6 Things You Didn’t Know About Hospice

(1) Hospice is a philosophy of care that is derived from palliative care. Palliative care simply means comfort care, and aims toward making the patient as comfortable as possible (Sarah Hopkins).

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(2) In order to qualify for hospice, you have to be diagnosed as having six months or less to live, if the disease you have would take it’s course without interruption. They are currently trying to make hospice available to those who have twelve months left to live. Hospice is also available to the partners of someone who has recently died for up to thirteen months (Sarah Hopkins).

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(3) There is no specific age limit of patients who qualify for hospice. The youngest patient Sarah has was two days old, while the oldest was over one hundred. Age is not a factor in determining if a person gets hospice care (Sarah Hopkins).

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(4) Hospice can be paid for by medicare, medicaid, or even private insurance companies (Sarah Hopkins).

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(5) The patient receiving hospice care is allowed to keep their own doctor throughout the time they are on it. The patient is only required to accept visits from the hospice nurse at least once every two weeks (Sarah Hopkins).

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(6) It is important for someone working as a hospice social worker to never say “I know exactly what you are going through.” Everyones experience is different even if they seem similar, and it is important to be sensitive to different peoples losses (Sarah Hopkins).

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References

Sarah Hopkins

4 Tips For Motivationally Interviewing Patients With Mental Illness

(1) It is really important for mental health social workers to express empathy when interviewing clients. Once a client accepts their illness it becomes easier to change the negative behavior. Reflective listening is very important in order to form a relationship with the client (DiNitto & McNeece, 2008, PG. 160).

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(2) The social worker needs to be able to develop discrepancy. It is normal for clients to recognize and explore differences between their goals for future behavior and their current behavior. Change is motivated by the client realizing that their future behavior can be different from their current behavior. It is also important that the client, and not the social worker, present ideas and arguments for future change (DiNitto & McNeece, 2008, PG. 160).

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(3) As a social worker in the mental health field, it is possible that you will come across clients who don’t want to change. When this occurs, it is important to roll with the resistance. Accept a client’s reluctance to change and don’t oppose their resistance directly. It is crucial for the client to be the primary resource in finding answers and solutions (DiNitto & McNeece, 2008, PG. 160).

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(4) The client needs to believe that positive change is possible. It is not the social workers job to choose and carry out a plan for future change. This falls directly on the client. By supporting self efficacy, the client can benefit immensely (DiNitto & McNeece, 2008, PG. 160).

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Works Cited:

DiNitto, D. M., & McNeece, C. A. (2008). Social Work Issues and Opportunities (3rd ed.). Chicago, IL: Lyceum Books.

 

5 Things Charlie Kramer Feels Are Important When Working with People With Disabilities

(1) It it extremely important for the patient to be able to tell what they would like to do in regards to different treatment options. It is possible that the family of the patient will want to make all the decisions for them and think they know best, so sometimes as a social worker you have to make it clear to them that the patient has the right to chose what they want to do. It is important to stick up for the patient and give them what they want. The individual should be in charge and run the program (Charlie Kramer).

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(2) Being that it is much easier to just perform a task for patients than let them learn the hard way, it can become very difficult to “sit on your hands”, or stand back and let the patient struggle until they figure it out (Charlie Kramer).

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(3) You will come across a lot of stigma and prejudice in this field of social work. People may often refer to those with mental disabilities as “those kinds of people”, and assume they can’t function with the rest of society (Charlie Kramer).

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(4) Charlie does not have a certain age range that he works with. He is willing to work with anyone who walks into his office asking for help (Charlie Kramer).

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(5) It is very important to dedicate time to yourself when working in this field. If you are not healthy and happy than you can turn into a “crispy critter” and form an attitude with anyone who asks for help (Charlie Kramer).

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References:

Charlie Kramer

5 Things You Didn’t Know About School Social Work

(1) When one begins their career as a school social worker, they are required to sign a document regarding the rules about confidentiality. This can get tricky when someone above the social workers asks to see certain files. In some cases it may be clear that the person requesting the information is just noisy and it is not necessary for them to know. As a social worker you are allowed to ask why this person wants access to the information. On the other hand, if a child becomes violent it may be necessary to release the confidential information (Sam Bligen).

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(2) Some parents or guardians may be super helpful and willing to talk to school social workers. It is also possible for parents/guardians to not cooperate with the social worker which can cause tension and animosity which can affect the child (Sam Bligen).

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(3) As a social worker working with young children, it is important to remember that each child may have a different account of exactly what happened. It is the duty of the social worker to dig deeper and play out each scenario before taking action (Sam Bligen).

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(4) It is possible for a school social worker to have a liaison that helps them determine when it is necessary to call CPS. This is useful because some social workers may become “hotline trigger happy” and want to call CPS on every minor behavioral issue (Sam Bligen).

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(5) It is really important to network in school social work. You will never know when you’ll require someones advice or opinion on something, so it becomes helpful to align yourself with people you work with on a regular basis (Sam Bligen).

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References:

Guest Speaker: Sam Bligen

 

5 Facts About Foster Kids

(1) Children do not always end up in foster care because their parents abused or mis treated them. Sometimes parents pass away, and the child is placed with a relative, such as an aunt or uncle, who is now the child’s primary guardian. The aunt or uncle may not be happy taking care of someone else’s child, even though they are family. This can cause a lot of hostile feelings in the home, and also cause the child to feel neglected and isolated (Know How Film).

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(2) Children who get taken from their homes often have very hostile feelings towards social workers. They do not see the social worker as someone who is trying to help them, but rather someone who is attempting to tear their family apart (Know How Film).

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(3) It is also possible for siblings who go into a foster home together, to later become separated. This can cause even more hostile feelings toward the social worker and other social service workers. Although most agencies make an extreme effort to keep siblings together, it does’t always work out (Know How Film).

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(4) The atmosphere in a group home can be very aggressive. It is safe to assume that most of the people in these homes are not happy about it. This can cause the child to feel depressed and alone (Know How Film).

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(5) Children who have no one to take care of them will resort to stealing money in order to feed themselves. Once they get comfortable robbing people, it is not long before they start committing other crimes just to get by. These kids believe that selling drugs is an easy way to make money without a high school degree, and they hardly think about the long term consequences. Once kids have drugs at their disposal, it won’t be long before they start to experiment with them (Know How Film).

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5 Facts About Substance Abusers

(1) Most people who suffer from substance or alcohol abuse do so because of something traumatic they have experienced as a child. This traumatic event could be sexual abuse, physical abuse, or even just witnessing something violent and traumatic. The person with the substance abuse problem has probably not talked about the event since it happened, so they do not know how to process it and use drugs and alcohol to self medicate (Merrit Hartblay).

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(2) You can not put addicts into categories of good people or bad people. They are simply people who have made some bad decisions. Almost everyone makes a bad decision at some point in their life, and a few bad decisions should not define who you are as a person (Merrit Hartblay).

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(3) When trying to help someone who suffers from substance or alcohol abuse it is important to remember that you can not force someone to stop using and stay clean. The abuser needs to want to change themselves or they will not be successful (Merrit Hartblay).

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(4) It is not just the addict that is affected by their substance abuse. The entire family of the abuser is affected by the substance abuse (Merrit Hartblay).

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(5) Relapse happens way before the addict uses the drugs or drinks the alcohol. Relapse happens as soon as the abuser starts thinking that they can no longer stay clean (Merrit Hartblay).

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